03171nam a22004574a 4500001001300000003000600013005001700019006001900036007001500055008004100070035002000111040001700131020003300148035002100181035002100202041001800223050002500241090002300266049000900289100002100298245006900319260005400388300002200442490003300464504003900497520153200536538003602068546006002104588004702164590002902211590001502240600003902255650005602294650005202350651001802402700003902420830003402459856012002493994001202613999008802625ocn910938652OCoLC20150611115010.0m |o d | cr cn|||||||||150611s2004 mau gob 00| p eng d a(Sirsi) a186940 aMaCbHUPcNVS z9780674996090qprint version a(OCoLC)910938652 a(OCoLC)6072254911 aengalathlat00aPA6395b.H673 2014EB aPA6394b.R8 2014eb aNVSS0 aHorace,eauthor.10aOdes and epodes /cHorace ; edited and translated by Niall Rudd. aCambridge, MA :bHarvard University Press,c2014. a1 online resource1 aLoeb Classical Library ;v33 aIncludes bibliography and indexes. aThe poetry of Horace (born 65 BCE) is richly varied, its focus moving between public and private concerns, urban and rural settings, Stoic and Epicurean thought. His Odes cover a wide range of moods and topics. Love and political concerns are frequent themes of the Epodes.bThe poetry of Horace (born 65 BCE) is richly varied, its focus moving between public and private concerns, urban and rural settings, Stoic and Epicurean thought. Here is a new Loeb Classical Library edition of the great Roman poet's Odes and Epodes, a fluid translation facing the Latin text. Horace took pride in being the first Roman to write a body of lyric poetry. For models he turned to Greek lyric, especially to the poetry of Alcaeus, Sappho, and Pindar; but his poems are set in a Roman context. His four books of odes cover a wide range of moods and topics. Some are public poems, upholding the traditional values of courage, loyalty, and piety; and there are hymns to the gods. But most of the odes are on private themes: chiding or advising friends; speaking about love and amorous situations, often amusingly. Horace's seventeen epodes, which he called iambi, were also an innovation for Roman literature. Like the odes they were inspired by a Greek model: the seventh-century iambic poetry of Archilochus. Love and political concerns are frequent themes; here the tone is generally that of satirical lampoons. "In his language he is triumphantly adventurous," Quintilian said of Horace; this new translation reflects his different voices. aMode of access: World Wide Web. aText in Latin with English translation on facing pages. aDescription based on print version record. aLoeb cat 6/11/15 DJW ftu a z E-book00aHoracevTranslations into English. 0aLaudatory poetry, LatinvTranslations into English. 0aVerse satire, LatinvTranslations into English. 0aRomevPoetry.1 aRudd, Niall,eeditor,etranslator. 0aLoeb Classical Library ;v33.403Loeb Classical Library uhttp://ezproxy.sebts.edu/login?url=http://www.loebclassics.com/view/LCL033/2004/volume.xml aC0bNVS aPA6394 .R8 2014 EBwLCc1i186940-1001lE-BOOKmMAINrNsYtE-BOOKu6/11/2015xLOEB